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Course Specification

Course Name: Grammar 1

Course Code: Eng 111

Credit Hours: 3

Level:  1

Pre-requisites: None

Course Description:             

The aim of this course is to develop students' abilities in using grammar and its usage, help them in using language. It also presents students with a foundation of English grammar and proper usage by providing extensive and varied practice that encourages growth in all areas of language use. The major topics of study include verb tenses, asking questions, nouns/pronouns, modal auxiliaries, comparisons, count and non-count nouns/articles, clauses, phrasal verbs, and preposition combinations.

Textbook(s)Interactions I: Grammar (2009). Elaine Kirn & Darcy Jack, London:                     McGraw Hill.

Course Title: Listening and Speaking 1

Course Code: Eng 112

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 1

Pre-requisites: None

Course Description: 

The course is developed with the objective of enabling students master specific situational vocabulary items and notice and apply them. It also aims to activate prior knowledge (background schemata) in order to locate and be familiar with the tasks and activities attempted through pre-listening activities. The contents help cultivate critical thinking by having to infer on the basis of furnished information.

Textbook: Judith Tanka and Paul Most (2009). Interactions – 1 Listening and Speaking : McGraw-Hill.

 

Course title:  Writing 1

Course code: Eng 113

Credit hours: 3

Level: 1  

Pre-requisites: None

 Course description:

The aim of this course is to adapt the students with basics of English language writing components through a gradual, step-by-step approach. The course is designed to introduce learners into basic writing skills which will prepare them for academic writings in English language. The course focuses on the practice of the sentence structure and it will help the students to develop their writing to compose good written paragraphs.

Textbook(s): R. Harrison (1996) (12th ed.). Keep Writing 2. Longman.

 

Course Title: Reading 1

Course Code: Eng 114

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 1

Pre-requisites: None

Course Description:

The course is developed with the objective of enabling students to recognize reading structure in a text book, main ideas, supporting details, topics, and getting meaning from context. They will be able to identify cause and effect, recognize titles and paragraph topics, and supporting details. They will use skimming for topics and main ideas, and to make inferences. They will be able to understand anecdotes, and to recognize supporting detail. They will also be able to recognize reading structure: similarities and differences, and to read for literal meaning and inferences.

Textbook(s): Elaine  Kirn & Pamela Hartmann( 2009 ) Interactions 1 (Reading) (Middle East Gold Edition)

 

Course Title: Grammar 2

Course Code: Eng 121

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 1

Pre-requisites: Grammar 1 (Eng 111)

Course Description:

The course aims at helping students comprehend the basic knowledge of grammatical structure, use of fundamental grammatical elements and knowledge of grammar structures through both direct instruction and through exposure to the variety of authentic materials used in the course. The major topics of study include subject-verb agreement, modals, kinds of verbs, pronouns, phrases, the past, infinitives, modal verbs, and pronouns.

Textbooks: 1. Patricia K. Werner, John P. Nelson & Keesia Hyzer Mary Mitchell Church (2009). Interactions II: Grammar, London: McGraw Hill.

 

 

 

 

Course Title: Listening and Speaking 2

Course Code: Eng 122

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 2

Pre-requisites: Listening and Speaking 1 (Eng 112)

Course Description:

The course will enable students to use context clues to guess locations, to identify a speaker, to guess a person's job, to attempt to understand people's lifestyles, to guess about customs and body language, to identify people's tastes and preferences and to identify ceremonies. Giving impromptu speech, using expressions to offer, accept or decline help, comparing American and British English, talking about a vacation and generalizing are also covered in order to hone their listening skills for information.

Textbook: Judith Tanka and Lida Baker (2009). Interactions – 2

 

Course Title:  Writing  2

Course Code : Eng 123 

Contact Hours: 3

Level:   2

Pre-requisites:  Writing 1 (Eng 113)

Course description:

The general objective of this course is to enable intermediate students to progress from the pre-intermediate level. The course is designed to introduce/review and consolidate the following features of style and cohesion which will enable the students to develop their writing skills from those taught at the previous level.

The course focus will be on organizing ideas in order of importance, supporting opinions with reasons, writing topic sentences, writing concluding sentences, free writing to generate ideas and using graphic organizer to connect argument and reasons

Textbook: Cheryl Pavilk and Margaret Keenan Segal (2009) Interactions 2 -Writing, McGraw Hill Education.

 

Course Title: Reading 2

Course Code: Eng 124

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 2

Pre-requisites: Reading 1 (Eng 114)

Course Description:

The course is developed with the objective of enabling students to understand meanings of the new words, the main idea of paragraphs, and different emotions. They will also be able to distinguish main idea from details, analyze and paraphrase the passage, and to scan for specifications. Moreover, they will be able to find plot, forecast, comprehend the reading, and to identify the supporting details about the main idea. They will be able to tell details in reading with extraction and analysis of main points.

Text Book: Pamela   Hartmann & Elaine Kirn (2009) Interactions 2 (Reading) (Middle East Gold Edition)

 

 

Course Name: Grammar 3

Course Code  : Eng 211

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 3

Pre-requisites: Grammar 2 (Eng 121)

Course Description:

The general objective of this course is to enable students to improve their grammatical structures and to develop the students' ability in following grammatical rules and proper usage by providing all-embracing and varied practice that persuade growth in all areas of language use. The major topics of study include perfect and progressive tenses, the passive, present perfect tense, adverbs of degree, and the different uses of connectives and conditionals.

Textbook: Patricia K. Werner Lou Spaventa, (2007). Mosaic 1 Grammar, London: McGraw Hill.

 

Course Title: Listening and Speaking 3

Course Code: Eng 212

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 3

Pre-requisites: Listening and Speaking 2 (Eng 122)

Course Description:

The course features tasks and activities like sharing personal observations of cooperation and competition, collaborating to brainstorm plans for a scientific expedition, making challenging excuses in everyday situations, listening for expressions that offer clarification, listening for information to label and explain diagrams, listening for expressions of likes and dislikes, pleasure and displeasure and listening for the main points in a lecture.

Textbook: Jami Hanreddy and Elizabeth Whalley (2008) Mosaic – 1Listening and Speaking,  McGraw Hill.

 

Course Title:  Writing 3

Course Code: Eng 213 

Credit hours: 3

Level: 3

Pre-requisites:  Writing 2  (Eng 123)

Course description:

This course is to develop the students' ability to write and to refine their writing techniques in terms of more sophisticated lexis and construction. The focus will be on essay writing. This course will act as a revision course of the previous writing courses in terms of paragraph writing. By the end of this course the students will be able to write a cause and effect essay, an information essay, an analysis essay, a definition essay, an interpretation essay and write an argument essay

Textbook: Merdith Pike-Baky   and Laurie Blass( 2008) Mosaic 1( Writing)  Gold edition, McGraw Hill.  

 

 

Course Title: Reading 3

Course Code: Eng 214

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 3

Pre-requisites: Reading 2 (Eng 124)

Course Description:

The course is developed with the objective of enabling students to understand meanings of the new words, the main idea of paragraphs, and different emotions. They will also be able to distinguish main idea from details, analyze and paraphrase the passage, and to scan for specifications. Moreover, they will be able to find plot, forecast, comprehend the reading, and to identify the supporting details about the main idea. They will be able to tell details in reading with extraction and analysis of main points.

Text Book: Brenda    Wegmann and Miki Knezevic (2009). Mosaic 1 (Reading) (Middle East Gold Edition) 

 

Course Title: Vocabulary 1

Course Code: Eng 215

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 4

Pre-requisites: None

Course Description: 

Success in academic life requires a wide range of vocabulary. This course is designed to teach students different effective strategies for vocabulary development as well as using them in academic context through a wide variety of reading, writing and other relevant activities. The course explores dictionary uses, pronunciation symbols, spelling rules, word formation – roots, prefix, and suffix, idioms and phrasal expressions. Again, the course emphasizes to instill keeping vocabulary notebook and acquiring new vocabulary as a continuing lifelong habit.  Students will be able to utilize learned vocabulary in a variety of academic skills such as reading, writing, listening and speaking, pronounce and spell words correctly, demonstrate improved vocabulary recognition skill in reading as well as in listening, and instill vocabulary development habits within themselves.

Textbook: Stuart Redman, (2003). English Vocabulary in Use: Pre-intermediate and Intermediate. Cambridge University Press.

 

Course title: English Phonetics 

Course code: Eng 221

Contact hours: 3

Level: 4

Pre-requisites: None

Course description:

This course is mainly concerned with English phonetics. It introduces briefly the English   sound system; this includes the production of speech sounds, human speech organs, place and manner of articulation, description and distribution of English vowels and consonants. Phonetic description of English words has to be taught and students have to receive more training on how to transcribe and pronounce sounds and words phonetically.      

Textbooks

1. Jackson, Howard (1982). Analyzing English. Oxford: Pergamon Press.

2. Hassan, Z. M. (2000). English Phonetics Phonology for Arab Students. Amman: Al-Hamed Press.

3. Roach, Peter (2000). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University   Press.

   

Course Title: Listening and Speaking 4

Course Code: Eng 222

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 4

Pre-requisites: Listening and Speaking 3 (Eng 212)

Course Description:

The course invites students to participate in situations like discussing hopes and fears, developing strategies for getting help when confused, listing the main ideas from the Teacher's instructions, discussing surveys and selecting questions, role-playing on how to encourage a friend and designing a student-teacher dialogue. Students will listen to evaluate and judge given contexts to draw logical conclusions.

Textbook: Mary Shepard Wong ( )You Said It! Listening/ Speaking Strategies and Activities

 

Course Title:  Writing 4

Course Code: Eng 223   

Credit Hours: 3

Level:   4

Pre-requisites: Writing 3 (Eng 213)

Course description:

This course will help the students to further the students' ability to write full-length academic essays, and refine their writing techniques and use of vocabulary and complex syntactic patterns. The course will also refine and develop the skills learnt in Writing 3. 

Textbook: Merdith Pike-Baky   and Laurie Blass (2009). Mosaic 2- Writing  Gold edition.

Course Title: Reading 4

Course Code: Eng 224

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 4

Pre-requisites: Reading 3 (Eng 214)

Course Description:

The course is developed with the objective of enabling students to comprehend long passages and elicit the proper answers on the questions based on these passages. It aims at allowing students to apply reading strategies effectively to understand difficult expressions and vocabulary items in the given texts.

 

Textbook: Slaght, J., Harben, P., & Pallant, A. (2009). English for Academic Study: Reading. Garnet Education

 

Course Title: Vocabulary 2

Course Code: Eng 225

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 4

Pre-requisites: Vocabulary 1 (Eng 215)

Course Description:

It aims to expand the vocabulary of the students through practicing different exercises to acquire not only new vocabulary, but also to retain the learned one and to use them in academic life. Students will learn vocabulary through different contexts of topics as well as mechanics of word formations such as roots, prefixes and suffixes. Emphasis will be given on correct pronunciation by familiarizing themselves with pronunciation symbols. Again, students will be taught different mnemonic rules to memorize new vocabulary as a lifelong habit.

Textbook(s): Michael McCarthy and Felicity O'Dell(2003) English Vocabulary in Use Upper-intermediate and Advanced. Cambridge University Press

 

Course title: Introduction to Linguistics

Course Code: Eng 311

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 5

Pre-requisites: None  

Course Description:

The course seeks to introduce students to the basic tenets of linguistics and language analysis with special reference to the core areas in phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.  The course will help students understand all theoretical and applied areas in linguistics throughout their B.A study programme.

The course introduces the basic linguistic concepts and provides a short overview of modern linguistics and language analysis. It introduces students to the main tenets of linguistics as the scientific study of language over the twentieth and twenty first centuries. Besides, it discusses briefly the core areas in linguistic science, namely, phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. It also reviews briefly general topics in theoretical and applied linguistics.    

Textbooks

1. George, Yule (2004). The Study of Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University press.

2. Akmajian, et al. (2001). An Introduction to Language and Communication. MIT Press.

 

Course Title: Introduction to Literature

Course Code: Eng 312

Credit Hours: 3

Level: 5

Pre-requisites: None

Course Description:

This course introduces students to a selection of literary readings that may provide them with pleasure and thought. As is the case with any fresh literary reading, this course takes into account the student's level of literary appreciation as well as their linguistic limitations, and is thus carefully designed with a primary focus on basic elements of literature and a progressive expansion of its genres. So, while teaching this course in the classroom, the teacher is supposed to discuss the elements first and then switch on to the selections. The course will include poetry, short story and drama.

Textbooks:

1. Abrams, M H: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vols. I & II, 7th Edition

2. Griffith, Kelly: Writing Essays About Literature, Fifth Edition, Harcourt Brace and Co., 1982.

 

Course Title: Advanced Composition

Course Code: Eng 313

Credit Hours: 3

Level: 5

Pre-requisites: Writing 4 (Eng 223)

Course Description:

This is an advanced course designed to enable the students to consolidate the writing skills they have already acquired from their preceding 1-4 levels. Apart from reinforcing their skills of writing, for example, the use of conventions and the mechanics of written English, the appropriate and effective use of English grammar and vocabulary, the course aims at practical and comprehensive use of English language skills that require greater originality and creativity. Students should be given assignments that would develop their ‘research' abilities, calling for collection and sifting of data, examination of evidence, discrimination and classification of ideas, building an argument and drawing a conclusion. Formal matters like tapping library sources, bibliography, sensible quoting, citing and footnoting, should form a crucial part of the course. Besides, the course should enable the learners to develop their further abilities on areas such as writing stories, a critical review and business correspondence.

Textbooks:

1. Stevens, B. K. (1983).  Discovery: An Inductive Approach to College Writing, Holt Sounders.

2. Robins (1980). The Writer's Practical Rhetoric, John Wiley.

3. Bailey, E. et al. (1981). Writing Research Papers: A Practical Guide, Holt.

 

Course Title: Phonology

Course Code: Eng 314

Contact Hours: 3

Level: 5

Pre-requisites: Phonetics  (Eng 221)

Course description:

This course provides a general idea about sounds and their variants. It also discusses concepts such as phonemes, allophones, phones, complementary distribution and free variation. Besides, it introduces students to technical terms such as syllable, stress, and intonation in English with reference to illustrative examples from Arabic.  

 Textbooks

1. Jackson, Howard (1982) Analyzing English. Oxford: Pergamon Press.

2. Hassan, Z. M. (2000).  English Phonetics Phonology for Arab Students. Amman: Al-Hamed Press.

3. Roach, Peter (2000).  English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University   Press.

 

Course Title: Introduction to Translation

Course Code: Eng 315

Credit Hours: 3

Level: 5

Pre-requisites: None

Course Description:

This course aims at enabling students to utilize their knowledge of both languages (Arabic and English, to improve such knowledge, and to enhance their command of both languages systematically. In addition, it aims at providing students with theoretical instruction and practical experience in translating the basic components of Arabic and English texts. The course will also focus on ggeneral introduction to translation, grammatical and syntactic differences between English and Arabic, translating noun phrases, verbs and tenses, translating the different types of sentences.

Textbooks : Ghazalah, H. (2004). Translation as Problems and Solutions.

Course Title: Applied Linguistics

Course Code: Eng 321

Credit Hours: 3

Level: 6

Pre-requisites: Introduction to Linguistics (Eng 311)

Course Description:

In this course, students will learn about the history and development of what is now called Applied Linguistics. This will include understanding how different linguistic theories play a role in Applied Linguistics; why the distinction between Linguistics and Applied Linguistics is made.

The course introduces applied linguistics as a multidisciplinary approach linking theoretical linguistic studies, educational research and the planning and implementation of practical programs in foreign and second language teaching. Topics include the definition of the term, its relation to the other disciplines, second language acquisition theories, contrastive analysis, error analysis, learning strategies, individual differences, and socio-cultural factors in second language learning.

Textbooks:

1)      Cook, Guy (2003). Applied Linguistics: Oxford: OUP.

2)      Davies, Alan (2007). An Introduction to Applied Linguistics: from practice to theory, 2nd Edition, Edinburgh University Press.

3)      Littlewood, W. (1984). Foreign and Second Language Learning, CUP.

 

Course Title: Poetry

Course Code: Eng 322

Credit Hours: 3

Level: 6

Pre-requisites: Introduction to Literature (Eng 312)

 

Course Description:

This course has two primary purposes: (1) to introduce students to some of the achievements of poets writing in English and (2) to help them become a discriminating and confident reader of poetry on their own.

By the end of the course, students will find that poetry, though often difficult and demanding, can offer intense and complex pleasure---- emotional, imaginative, and intellectual. They will understand better what poetry is and what kind of responses it invites from its readers, realizing that poetry is not just a prose idea cast into "secret code" or dressed in fancy clothes by a poet who could have made the point more directly.

There will be selections from a wide range of poems of different historical periods, written in a wide range of forms and styles. The first part of the course will tend to emphasize the various elements of poetry— introduction, imagery, figurative language, tone, sound and rhythm, and so on. In the second part, they spend more time considering what they can learn from studying a poem in the context of other poems by the same author or poems on a similar subject. Finally, the course also aims at helping learners further develop their skills in analysis and writing.

Recommended Textbooks:

1.      The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vols. I & II

2.      Griffith, Kelly: Writing Essays about Literature, Fifth Edition, Harcourt Brace and Co., 1982.

 

Course Title: Language Testing

Course Code: Eng 323

Credit Hours: 3

Level: 6

Pre-requisites: None

Course Description:

This course is intended to provide a working knowledge of the basic principles and procedures for test construction and testing with an emphasis on the Foreign Language Context.  It gives the students a theoretical orientation to the field of testing in language teaching and learning. The course covers the concepts related to testing such as the types of tests, validity, reliability and other related issues in testing reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammar and vocabulary.   

The course helps English majors acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for writing effective language tests. Greater emphasis will be placed on giving the students enough practice in the different processes of constructing a variety of useful test items. In this way, hopefully, the students will develop a deeper insight into the fundamentals and techniques of testing English as a foreign language.

Textbook: Harold S. Madsen (1983). Techniques in Testing, Oxford: OUP

Course Title: Approaches to Language Teaching

Course Code: Eng 324

Credit Hours: 3

Level: 6

Pre-requisites: None

Course Description:

This course is a critical survey of the field of methodology in second language teaching. The course examines approaches to different issues in teaching, theoretical foundations to language teaching and the methodological principles and procedures derived from them as well as a host of unresolved issues. The course does not espouse any particular approach to second language teaching but rather presents an overview of the many approaches to teaching second and foreign languages.

The course aims to develop a theoretical understanding and practical experience with several approaches to learning and teaching a second/foreign language. The course covers major approaches such as Silent Way, Community Language Learning, Suggestopedia, Total Physical Response, and Natural Approach, Task-Based Learning, etc.

 

Textbooks

1)      Richards, J. C. and T. S. Rodgers. 2001. Approaches and methods in language

teaching. 2nd ed. New York: Cambridge University Press

2)      Larsen-Freeman, D. 2000. Techniques and principles in language teaching. 2nd

ed. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Course Title: Translation 2

Course Code: Eng 325

Credit Hours: 2

Level: 6

Pre-requisites: Introduction to Translation (Eng 315)

Course Description:

The course aims at giving more information about the most important theoretical issues in translation. It also works on furthering and developing the concepts, skills and techniques of translation studied and practiced before. The course exposes students to a good variety of texts from different registers. It also introduces students to the different types of text genres: religious, scientific, political, legal and commercial. The course will also focus on translation as Process and Product, translation and culture, translation and equivalence.

Textbook(s): Baker, M. (1992).  A Coursebook on Translation. London: Routledge

John Benjamins.

 

Course Title: Language Acquisition

Course Code: Eng 411

Credit Hours: 3

Level: 7

Pre-requisites: Applied Linguistics (Eng 321)

Course Description:

This course aims to explore the processes of language development in young children learning their first languages as well as older children or adults learning a second or additional language. It covers theoretical approaches to language acquisition, including cognitive, psycholinguistic, socio-cultural and language socialization theories. Special attention will be paid to similarities and differences between first and second language acquisition, as well as implications of research for foreign language teaching.

The course discusses the process of second language acquisition such as the effects of the first language, the age of acquisition, motivation, aptitude, input factors and individual learner strategies.

Textbooks:

1)      Gass, Susan M. and Selinker, Larry (2008). Second Language Acquisition: An Introductory Course, 3rd edition, Taylor & Francis.

2)      McLaughlin, Barry (1987). Theories of Second-Language Learning, London: Edward Arnold.

 

Course Title: Drama

Course Code: Eng 412

Credit Hours: 2

Level: 7

Pre-requisites: Introduction to Literature (Eng 312)

Course Description:

This course aims to help students: A. read drama, from short plays to longer works, with discernment; B. analyze the elements and strategies of drama; and C. respond articulately to dramatic works, both orally and in writing. Students will analyze dramatic texts through close reading, so that they can identify aspects, such as characterization, plot structure, and symbolism, which interact to produce the artistic effect and meaning of the work. They should be able to reason inductively about drama; for example, by examining specific instances in the play being analyzed, students will practice recognizing meaningful patterns in language and incident and identifying themes. Moreover, Students will learn to do acting warm-ups, improvisations, monologues, and two-, three, and four-person scenes. Performances and some selected in-class work may be video-recorded for analysis and evaluation. Finally, they are expected to comprehend and use such elementary critical terms as exposition, rising action, climax, denouement, etc.

Selections:

1.         William Shakespeare: The Tempest

2.         Christopher Marlowe: Doctor Faustus

3.         Bernard Shaw: Saint Joan

4.         Ibsen: A Doll's House

References:

A C Bradley: Shakespearean Tragedy, McMillan, 1987.

The Bedford Introduction to Drama.  Edited by Lee Jacobus. New York, St. Martin's Press, 1989.

Abrams, M H. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vol 1 & 2

Allardyce Nicoll. The British Drama: A Historical Survey from the Beginning to the Present Time. G Harrap

Course Title: Novel

Course Code: Eng 413

Credit Hours: 2

Level: 7

Pre-requisites: Introduction to Literature (Eng 312)

Course Description:

New historical and literary periods are generally established as a reaction to past models, ideals and philosophical foundations. This is true of English novel from the 18th Century to the second half of the 20th century. The emergence and development of the novel will be studied in light of empire, war, feminism, gender, psychoanalysis, avant-garde movements, mass culture and theories of the novel. We will also consider the significance of innovative literary techniques such as point of view, setting, plot, characterization, impressionism, stream of consciousness, and authorial impersonality.

Selections:

1.      Daniel Dafoe: Robinson Crusoe

2.      Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice

3.      Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness

4.      Hemingway: The Old Man and the Sea

5.      Virginia Woolf: To the Light House


Course title: Morphology & Syntax 1

Course Code: Eng 414

Contact hours: 3

Level: 7

Pre-requisites: Introduction to Linguistics (Eng 311)

Course Description:

The aim of this course is to provide the students with a general introduction to English morphology and syntax. It introduces students to the basic morphological and syntactic concepts and notions. It is designed to give the students a brief glimpse of the theory and practice of the structural grammar of the English language. A detailed analysis of English morphemes and word formation processes as well as the structure of English sentences and phrases will be treated. Besides, it provides a brief idea about structural syntax. It also introduces students to the syntactic analysis developed by Noam Chomsky and his followers within the TGG framework.

Textbooks:

1. Haegeman, L. (1994). Introduction to Government and Binding Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

2. Radford, A. (1988). Transformational Grammar.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

3. Thakur , D. (2002).  Linguistics Simplified: Morphology. Patna: Bharati Bhawan.

 

Course title: History of the English Language

Course Code: Eng 415

Contact hours: 3

Level: 7

Pre-requisites: None

Course Description:

This course examines the history of English from its origins to its present status. Focus is drawn on both "internal" developments, such as changes in the sounds of the language and the ways sentences are structured and "external" factors, such as the social and political forces that carried English around the world. The course will look at some features of Englishes spoken outside Europe and North America. It will also include considerations of how and why languages change.

Textbooks:

1.      Millward, Celia M. (1996). A Biography of the English Language.  Harcourt College Publishers.

2.      Crystal, David. (1995). The Cambridge Encyclopedia of English Language.  Cambridge University Press.

 

Course Title: Research Methods

Course Code: Eng 416

Credit Hours: 2

Level: 7

Pre-requisites: None

Course Description:

This course introduces students to various approaches to research in the field of English language teaching. As part of this, students read and interpret a range of research reports, which use a variety of methodological approaches in the way data is collected, analyzed and interpreted.

Therefore, it becomes one of the requirements for students to graduate from the university. This is expected to cater for the knowledge and the ability to conduct a research on language teaching. Students understand the nature and the types of research and have basic knowledge about current issues on English Language Teaching Research.

Textbook(s):

1)      Bell, Judith (2005). Doing your Research Project: A guide for first-time researchers in education, health and social science,  Open University Press

2)      Nunan, D. (1992). Research Methods in Language Learning. Cambridge: CUP.

 

Course title: Semantics

Course Code: Eng 421

Contact hours: 3

Level: 8

Pre-requisites: Introduction to Linguistics (Eng 311)

Course Description:

The course will introduce the systematic study of meaning in language. Students are introduced to the complex issues of meaning relations. These issues will be presented as to cover three major semantic areas: meaning of isolated lexemes, sense relations on the paradigmatic level (vocabulary structure), and meaning and the interrelationship of semantics and syntax (syntagmatic level).

Textbooks:

1.      Hurford, James R. , Heasley, B., Smith, Michael B. (2007). (2nd ed.) Semantics- A

Course Book. Cambridge University Press.

2.      Leech, G.N. (1978). Semantics. Penguin.

 

Course title: Sociolinguistics

Course Code: Eng 422

Contact hours: 3

Level: 8

Pre-requisites: Introduction to Linguistics (Eng 311)

Course Description:

The course provides a broad overview of sociolinguistics, introducing both early foundational work and current issues in the field. Topics include language contact and language prestige, multilingualism and language ecology, regional and stylistic variation, verbal repertoire and communicative competence, language and social identity, codeswitching and diglossia, and language and culture.

Textbooks:

Stockwell, P. (2002). Sociolinguistics: A resource book for students. London: Routledge.

 

 

Course title: Language and Culture

Course Code: Eng 423

Contact hours: 3

Level: 8

Pre-requisites: Introduction to Linguistics (Eng 311)

Course Description:

This course provides an introduction to the study of language in its relationship with culture and society. It focuses on the roles of language and language use in constructing worldviews, cultural values, social relationships, institutional orders, places, and identities.  The course will explore the diverse ways in which people employ language in different cultures and social settings.

Textbooks:

1. Ottenheimer, Harriet Joseph, The Anthropology of Language

2. Bauer, Laurie and Peter Trudgill, Language Myths

 

Course title: Morphology & Syntax 2

Course Code: Eng 424

Contact hours: 3

Level: 8

Pre-requisites: Morphology & Syntax 1 (Eng 414)

Course Description:

The course is mainly concerned with morphology and syntax. Morphology studies word-structure in language. This course covers topics such as inflection and derivation. It introduces students to a whole range of technical terms that include morpheme, morph, allomorph; free morpheme, bound morpheme; root, base, stem and affixation; word-formation such as compounding, blending, back-formation, clipping, acronymy, duplication. etc.; case, gender, person, number, tense and agreement. It also discusses briefly morphophonemic rules such as the plural morpheme, the genitive morpheme the present and past tense morpheme and the negative morpheme.

Syntax, on the other hand, introduces students to syntactic theory with the framework developed by Noam Chomsky and his followers. It first reviews structural grammar and introduces briefly the IC analysis as an example of the structural analysis. The basic concepts of transformational-Generative grammar should be introduced to students; this includes deep and surface structures, tree-diagram and its terms, a brief idea about Standard Theory, the Principles and Parameters Theory (1981-1991), with some emphasis on the modules of Government and Binding theory of Chomsky (1981). It also provides a brief idea about Chomsky's minimalist analysis (1995).

Textbooks:

1. Haegeman, L. (1994). Introduction to Government and Binding Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

2. Radford, A. (1988). Transformational Grammar.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

3. Thakur , D. (2002).  Linguistics Simplified: Morphology. Patna: Bharati Bhawan.

 

Course Title: Research Project

Course Code: Eng 425

Credit Hours: 3

Level: 8

Pre-requisites: Advanced Composition (Eng 313)

Course Description:

Each student is asked to conduct a research project at a relatively independent level (with regular guidance by the academic supervisor) on a specialized topic related to the field of study covered in the B.A. level. The students and teacher must meet for at least two hours per week, and by the end of the course each student must produce a significant final written product of 20 to 25 pages. It is to be presented to the concerned teacher (usually the person who guides the student(s)).

The course is set to help the students to practically gain experience/get acquainted with the different aspects of doing academic research: scientific reasoning, scholarly communication, research methods, theoretical principles and their implications for actual research.

Textbook(s):

1)      Bell, Judith (2005).  Doing your Research Project: A guide for first-time researchers in education, health and social science,  Open University Press

2)      Nunan, D. (1992). Research Methods in Language Learning. Cambridge: CUP.